Thanks to financial planner David Boczar for sending along a thought-provoking quote from famed commodities trader Ed Seykota. Described as someone who turned $5,000 into $15 million over a dozen years, this uber trend follower Seykota cautions: "Surrender to the reality that volatility exists, or volatility will introduce you to the reality that surrender exists."

As I’ve written many times, risk management is not the same thing as risk minimization. Risk is neither inherently "good" or "bad" but rather a reality, with potentially crushing economic impact if ignored or given short shrift. As we’ve seen in recent days, some attempts to tame the risk lion have resulted in serious casualties.

It is no surprise then that pundits and reporters are asking about the whereabouts of risk managers, part of the frenzied blame game afoot. (Is there a "Where’s Waldo" equivalent here?) New York Times blogger Saul Hansell pressed a lot of hot buttons with his September 18, 2008 post entitled "How Wall Street Lied to Its Competitors." My response, now one of more than 100 posted responses, is shown below.

<< I concur with much of this article. Effective risk management is much more than quantitative analysis. Many individuals are lulled into false security when given a bunch of computer printouts, accepting numbers as gospel truth. Like the fictional Detective Columbo, decision-makers must search for “hidden” information, not reflected in computer printouts. I recently testified before the ERISA Advisory Council about “hard to value” assets. Click here to read my comments. http://www.investmentbestpractices.com/2008/09/articles/valuation/testimony-of-dr-susan-mangiero-about-hard-to-value-assets/

P.S. Some of the quants sat on boards of financial institutions. It would be helpful to know more about their role as relates to oversight of risk management activities. >>

To my last point (above), it should be noted that litigation risk could be a deterrent for prospective directors with risk management experience. For example, Ms. Leslie Rahl (who is quoted in Hansell’s blog post about the perils of underestimating risk of complex mortgage backed-securities) is, according to the Financial Post, named in a lawsuit filed against Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce (CIBC), along with others such as the former Chief Risk Officer and the current Chief Risk Officer. Journalist Jim Middlemiss quotes the bank as denying allegations and expressing confidence that their conduct was appropriate. (See "CIBC hit by suit over subprime lending," July 24, 2008.) Additionally Rahl, a former Citibank derivatives division head, is listed on the Fannie Mae website as a "Fannie Mae director since February 2004."

For interested readers who want to follow the mounting litigation related to sub-prime activities, check out attorney Kevin LaCroix’s blog entitled The D&O Diary. Be forewarned that Kevin posts volumes about Director and Officer (D&O) liability. Should we be disturbed that he has so much news about which to write?

What does this mean for institutional shareholders? Run, don’t walk, to the closest risk management analysts who can help you decipher whether a company is doing a "good" job of identifying, measuring and managing a panoply of financial and operational pain points. Send us an email if you want some help.

On the topic of models, my article entitled "Asset Valuation: Not a Trivial Pursuit" (FSA Times, The Institute of Internal Auditors, 2004) still rings true. Check out the 10 prescriptives discussed therein. (This is by no means an exhaustive list.)

  1. Gain an intuitive understanding of the model.
  2. Ask questions of the model builders.
  3. Determine whether or not a model meets regulatory requirements.
  4. Inquire whether or not different models are being used for tax reporting versus financial statement presentation.
  5. Understand the data issues.
  6. Ask about model access.
  7. Evaluate the asset portfolio mix.
  8. Ascertain the extent to which a model incorporates embedded derivatives.
  9. Determine the simulation approach used to value path-dependent securities.
  10. Enlist senior management to assign someone from the finance team to work closely with the auditing team.