As a follow-up to my January 12, 2017 announcement about retirement plan risk management education with the Professional Risk Managers’ International Association ("PRMIA"), I am delighted to announce a co-presenter for the February 23, 2017 learning event. Distinguished attorney Meaghan VerGow will talk about ERISA litigation and fiduciary risk management as part of "Establishing Risk Management Protocols for Defined Benefit Plans and Defined Contribution Plans." Click here to read Meaghan VerGow’s impressive bio as law firm partner and ERISA expert with O’Melveny & Myers LLP.

Session One will convene from 10:00 am EST to 11:15 am EST live this Thursday. If you cannot make it in real time, the event can be downloaded for later viewing. It is the debut event of four CPE-qualified events. Speakers will examine risk management for retirement plans from both a governance and economics perspective. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Procedural prudence and the costs of ignoring fiduciary risk;
  • Risk management differences by type of retirement plan;
  • Industry norms and pitfalls to avoid;
  • Role of Chief Risk Officer, investment committee members and in-house staff; and
  • Suggested elements of a Risk Management Policy Statement.

Visit the PRMIA website to register for Session One and read about course content for Sessions Two through Four. Our exciting roster of co-speakers for these future events will be posted shortly on this blog at www.pensionriskmatters.com

As I understand, the term "consultative selling" was first used by author and sales expert Mack Hanan. The concept is simple. Know what your customer needs and offer them solutions to their problems. The process is a two-way street. Both buyer and provider are actively involved and should communicate clearly and with respect. While lots of advisors and their firms find themselves on the A list, there is a continuing flurry of lawsuits being filed that allege self-dealing, opacity of disclosures and reasonableness of fees. Visit the 401k Help Center website section regarding court decisions and legal activity to read for yourself.

As with any industry, the investment community is constantly self-examining its practices in order to improve. This is a positive thing. As I point out in "Fake News, Plagiarism and Business Ethics," good players have a vested interest in self-policing since they can be tainted, reputation-wise, as the result of bad actions of others. I’ve spoken to hundreds of buyers of financial services who question the checks and balances of those who manage their money or otherwise influence their retirement planning decisions. Frequent and clear communications with their respective advisor, consultant or portfolio executive can go a long way in assuring the doubting Thomas. There is no shortage of inspiration about how to effectively interact.

Over the holidays, I observed a back and forth between sellers and buyers at a national jewelry store. While waiting my turn, I watched shop clerks attend to customers who seemed thoroughly prepared with questions about quality and price. I’m not a big purveyor of charms but was certainly impressed with the breadth of knowledge on both sides of the cash register. I can relate. As my friends know, I have a penchant for perfume and like to treat myself to a new scent now and then. I do my research in advance, visiting sites like Fragrantica.com. Wine connoisseurs are similarly motivated to gather information and sellers are wise to help educate them.

Whenever the product or service is personal, sellers must respond accordingly. Empower potential or existing customers with straightforward information. Be prepared to answer questions. Treat each client with respect as if they really count. For some organizations, the cost of selling could be too high unless the transaction is "large enough." Size is a perfectly fine business model to adapt but make it known in a courteous way that minimums apply. A small investor today could be your large investor tomorrow.

Most selling involves humans and that means that behaviors can’t be ignored. Before he passed away, famed sales guru Zig Ziglar said "You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help enough other people get what they want."

I’m delighted to work with the Professional Risk Managers’ International Association ("PRMIA") in delivering four (4) educational webinars about retirement plan risk management. According to its website, PRMIA is a "non-profit professional association" with forty-five chapters in various countries around the world. Click to download the PRMIA brochure for more information about membership. I hope you will join us in February and March for what should be an exciting and timely quartet of live events. If you cannot attend in real time, the webinars will be archived for later use. See below for details.

           Lead Instructor: Dr. Susan Mangiero, AIFA®, CFA®, CFE, FRM®, PPC™

                               Thursdays from 10:00 – 11:15 am EST / 3:00-4:15 GMT
                                       February 23 | March 2 | March 9 | March 16

                                                     A Virtual Training Series

This series consists of four webinar lectures, each one delivered with the goal of providing actionable information that can be used by the audience right away.

With approximately $100 trillion in global assets under management, retirement plan fiduciaries and their attorneys and advisors face numerous challenges in the aftermath of the worldwide credit crisis that began in 2008. Market volatility, investment complexity and compliance with new accounting standards and government mandates, alongside a strident call for better accountability and transparency, are a few of the pain points that keep pension executives up at night. Litigation and regulatory investigations are on the rise. As a result, enlightened pension decision-makers are turning their attention to risk management technology and techniques as a way to mitigate economic, legal and operating trouble uncertainties. Those who ignore the adverse impact of longer life spans, statutory capital requirements, binding financial statement reporting rules and broader fiduciary duties are destined for trouble. In some countries, trustees may be personally responsible for poor plan governance and may have to pay participants from their own pockets.

Who Should Attend

This series should be of interest to a broad range of financial and legal professionals since poor governance and/or too few resources being devoted to pension risk management within a fiduciary framework can (a) force benefit cutbacks for participants (b) lead to a ratings downgrade which increases a sponsor’s cost of capital (c) force a plan sponsor to come up with millions of dollars (pounds, euros, etc.) in cash for contributions (d) result in a costly lawsuit and/or regulatory enforcement (e) thwart a merger, acquisition or spin-off and/or (f) cause a sponsor to be out of compliance with financial and statutory reporting requirements.

Both senior-level decision makers and staff members can benefit from viewing this series of webinar lectures. Representative titles of likely audience members include: • Directors of the board • CFOs, treasurers, controllers and VPs of finance • Members of a sponsor’s pension investment committee • Pension consultants • Pension advisors • Pension and securities attorneys • Pension and securities regulators • Rating analysts • Financial journalists • Derivatives traders • Executives with derivatives and securities exchanges • ERISA, municipal and sovereign bond and D&O liability insurance underwriters • International, U.S. federal and state lawmakers • Think tank researchers • Industry associations • Chambers of Commerce in various countries • Economists who cover demographic patterns and • Risk management students.

Session One (February 23, 2017): Establishing Risk Management Protocols for Defined Benefit Plans and Defined Contribution Plans

Session One examines risk management for retirement plans from both a governance and economics perspective. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Procedural prudence and the costs of ignoring fiduciary risk;
  • Risk management differences by type of retirement plan;
  • Industry norms and pitfalls to avoid;
  • Role of Chief Risk Officer, investment committee members and in-house staff; and
  • Suggested elements of an Investment Policy Statement.

Session  Two (March 2, 2017): Use of Derivatives in Pension Plans

​Session Two looks at how derivatives are used by retirement plans, whether directly or indirectly. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Current usage of derivatives by retirement plans for hedging purposes;
  • Financially engineered investment products and governance implications:
  • Fiduciary duties relating to monitoring risks and values of derivatives; and
  • Suggested elements of a Risk Management Policy Statement.

Session Three (March 9, 2017): Liability-Driven Investing and Other Types of Pension Risk Transfer Strategies

Session Three examines the reasons why the number of pension restructuring deals is on the rise, especially in the United States and the United Kingdom, and the type of transactions being done. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Nature of the pension risk transfer market and various approaches being utilized;
  • Regulatory considerations for fiduciaries in selecting an annuity provider;
  • Action steps associated with implementing a pension risk transfer; and
  • Case study lessons learned.

Session Four (March 16, 2017): Service Provider Due Diligence

Session Four looks at the growth in the Outsourced Chief Investment Officer (“OCIO”) and Fiduciary Management markets and explains service provider risk. Topics to be discussed include the following:

  • Fiduciary considerations of delegating investment responsibilities to third parties;
  • Risk mitigation practices for selecting and monitoring vendors such as asset managers and advisors;
  • Types of lawsuits that allege fiduciary breach on the part of third parties and related regulatory imperatives; and
  • Identifying warning signs of possible vendor fraud.

Fee: Fee includes access to all four live sessions (75 minutes each), access to the recorded session for 60 days, and digital program materials.

  • Sustaining Members: $355.00
  • Contributing Members: $395.00
  • Free/Non-Members: $465.00

Registration: You may register for this course by clicking on Register at the bottom of the page. For questions regarding registration please contact PRMIA at training@prmia.org.

Cancellation: A refund (less a 15% administration fee) will be made if formal notice of cancelation is received at least 48-hours prior to the date of the first session. We regret that no refunds will be made after that date. Substitutions may be made at no extra charge.

Important Notice: All courses are subject to demand. PRMIA reserves the right to cancel or postpone courses at short notice at no loss or liability where, in its absolute discretion, it deems this necessary. PRMIA reserves the right to changes or cancel the program. PRMIA will issue 100% of registration refund should cancelation be necessary.

CPE Credits: This webinar series qualifies for 6 CPE credits subject to certain rules about required attendance. Email webinars@prmia.org for more information about obtaining continuing education credits.

About the Presenter:

Dr. Susan Mangiero is a forensic economist, researcher and author. With a background in finance, modeling and investment risk governance, Susan has served as an expert on numerous civil, criminal and regulatory enforcement actions involving corporate retirement plans, government retirement plans, hedge funds, private equity funds, foundations and high net worth individuals. She has been engaged by various financial service organizations to provide business intelligence insights about what institutional investors want from their vendors. As founder of an educational start-up company, Susan raised capital from outside investors, created a fiduciary-focused content library and developed a governance curriculum for institutional investors and their advisors. Prior to her doctoral studies, Susan worked at multiple bank trading desks in the areas of fixed income, foreign exchange, interest and currency swaps, financial futures, listed options and over-the-counter options.

Susan Mangiero is a managing director with Fiduciary Leadership, LLC. She is a CFA® charterholder, Professional Risk Manager™, certified Financial Risk Manager®, Accredited Investment Fiduciary Analyst®, Certified Fraud Examiner and Professional Plan Consultant™. Her award-winning blog, Pension Risk Matters®, includes nearly 1,000 essays about investment risk governance and has well over a million views. She is the creator and primary contributor to a second blog about investment compliance at www.goodriskgovernancepays.com. Susan is the author of Risk Management for Pensions, Endowments and Foundations. Her articles have appeared in multiple publications such as RISK Magazine, Bloomberg BNA Pension & Benefits Daily, Corporate Counsel, American Bankruptcy Institute Journal, Mergers & Acquisitions, Business Valuation Update, CFO Magazine and the Journal of Corporate Treasury Management.

Susan has testified before the ERISA Advisory Council and a joint meeting of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (“OECD”) and the International Organisation of Pension Supervisors (“IOPS”). She lectured at the Harvard Law School and addressed groups such as the American Institute of CPAs (“AICPA”) – Employee Benefits Section, Financial Executives International, and the National Association of Corporate Directors. She can be reached at contact@fiduciaryleadership.com or followed on Twitter @SusanMangiero.
 

When it comes to strategy games, count me in. Bridge and Scrabble are two of my favorites except when it looks like I have little chance for victory. It’s one thing to lose a hand or two but feel confident in a possible win. It’s altogether depressing to know that recovery is unlikely. This happened a few days ago when my husband added an E, U, A and L to create a cluster of words that scored him sixty-seven points. Ouch. Even with lots of high point letters, I knew that besting his bonanza move was improbable. Each time we play, I begin on an optimistic note and hope for a favorable outcome until that moment when I know it’s time to recast my calculations.

It’s good to wish upon a star yet just as important to distinguish fantasy from fiction. That’s why I was surprised to learn the results of a recent study of 400 institutional investors about their performance predictions. Carried out by State Street Global Advisors ("SSGA"), in conjunction with the research arm of the Financial Times, main takeaways from the "Building Bridges" study include the following:

  • Traditional asset allocation models may be unable to generate a long-term average rate of return of eleven percent, certainly without forcing buyers to take on more risk.
  • Forty-one percent of survey-takers expressed a preference for "traditional" classifications of asset exposures versus factor or objective-driven identifiers.
  • Eleven percent of those in search of closing "performance gaps" rank smart beta strategies as most important and 38 percent of institutional investors will employ this approach alongside other activities. "Significantly, three-quarters of those respondents who have introduced smart beta approaches found moderate to significant improvement in portfolio performance."
  • Enlightened decision-makers are finding it hard to get board approval of "better ways to meet long-term performance goals" and peer groups are slow to follow suit.
  • Eighty-four percent of pension funds, sovereign wealth funds and other asset owners believe that underperformance is likely to continue for one year.

As Market Watch journalist Chuck Jaffe somewhat indelicately points out in "An overlooked investment risk: wishful thinking" (May 18, 2016), long-term investors are daydreaming if they believe they can regularly generate eleven percent per annum. He quotes Lori Heinel, chief portfolio strategist at SSGA, as acknowledging the difficulty of achieving this number, given "a really challenging growth outlook, inflation environment, and a really challenging investment return environment." Notably, it was only a few weeks ago when the special mediator for the U.S. Treasury Department sent a letter to Central States Pension Fund trustees, denying a rescue plan in part because its 7.5 percent annual investment return assumptions were not viewed as "reasonable."

As I described in an earlier blog post entitled "A Pension Rock and a Hard Place," public pension funds, union leaders, taxpayer groups and policy-makers are navigating choppy asset-liability management waters. They are not alone. Corporate plans, endowments, foundations and other types of institutional investors are likewise challenged with getting to their destination and not crashing on the rocks. My unrealistic expectations might lose me a game. For long-term investors, there is serious money at stake and model inputs are being scrutinized accordingly.

I have long professed my concern that retirement issues get short shrift when it comes to political speeches and public discourse. I am not talking about industry discussions which occur all the time. I am referring instead to Main Street outreach. Even today, there seems to be scant mention by U.S. presidential candidates about how to strengthen programs like Social Security and reform tax laws to encourage savings. Of course what the pundits call the "silly season" has just begun, with many months of campaigning to go. Imagine my surprise then when, in between news segments this week, several ads appeared on television about impending changes. In one ad, a man and a woman are chatting in a car about their concern that talking to their advisor will become more expensive and they will end up talking to a robot. Another ad showcases a small business owner who worries that new regulations will make it harder for him to keep offering a 401(k) plan to his employees. Viewers are urged to call their lawmakers.

Research suggests that the ads are sponsored by the Secure Family Coalition. Its website lists organizations that include the following:

  • American Council of Life Insurers;
  • Association for Advanced Life Underwriting;
  • Insured Retirement Institute;
  • National Association for Fixed Annuities;
  • National Association of Independent Life Brokerage Agencies; and
  • National Association of Insurance and Financial Advisors.

On the opposite end of the spectrum are groups such the Institute for the Fiduciary Standard. Its website cites advocacy, research and education of the public as ways for "all those willing to help" to get involved.

Regardless of one’s stance about the U.S. Department of Labor proposal (and discussions by other regulators and lawmakers), the hope is that further conversations about retirement planning will encourage a long overdue focus on the abysmal state of readiness in this country and around the world.

If ads are hitting the airwaves now, is a Hollywood movie next?

I try hard to avoid duplication when contributing to this retirement plan blog (www.pensionriskmatters.com) versus writing about investment compliance on a broader scale (www.goodriskgovernancepays.com). However, there are times when I believe a topic has equal appeal to both plan sponsors and their advisers, attorneys, asset managers and other types of vendors.

With that in mind, I invite you to read "Fiduciary Outsourcing Considerations." As I have said both in private conversations and in public speeches, my work as a forensic economist (and sometimes testifying expert witness) leads me to predict that disputes between institutional investors and service providers are unlikely to disappear any time soon. The good news is that those who take governance seriously have a wonderful opportunity to develop and maintain business with risk management focused pension funds, endowments, foundations and other types of buyers.

The tug of war continues between pension plan participants and outside creditors. As a result, doing business with troubled municipalities may end up costing creditors time, money and headaches. Just a few days ago, Judge Christopher Klein with the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of California ruled against Franklin Templeton Investments. By doing so, this asset manager will not be able to recoup the $32 million it sought from the City of Stockton as the municipality seeks to exit bankruptcy. Instead, as Reuters journalist Robin Respaut writes in "Holdout creditor in Stockton bankruptcy denied higher claim" (December 10, 2014) the city’s plan would give Franklin "just over $4 million of the $36 million it said it is owed." This follows an October thumbs-up from the Court to reduce the payout to bond investors in order to maintain retirement and health care benefits and thereby (hopefully) prevent an exodus of badly needed city workers. 

A topic not actively discussed but critically important to ignore is that once-burnt lenders are unlikely to come knocking again. If they do, they will charge a higher cost of capital and demand tighter collateral safeguards to reflect the bigger risk associated with exposure to struggling borrowers. After all, lenders are accountable to their customers. As Bond Buyer‘s Keeley Webster describes, investors in Franklin California High Yield Municipal Fund and Franklin High Yield Tax-Free Income Fund will suffer as the result of a low recovery rate in the neighborhood of twelve percent for loans made to Stockton. 

As Attorney B. Summer Chandler discusses in "Is It ‘Fair’ to Discriminate in Favor of Pensioners in a chapter 9 Plan?" (American Bankruptcy Institute Journal, December 2014) putting pensioners ahead of other unsecured creditors may not seem right to some but could be supported by "limited case law assessing chapter 9 plans…" taking into account "the unique nature of a municipality, its relationship to its citizens (including pensioners and current employees) and the purposes of chapter 9…"

To reiterate, customer risk is real for organizations such as Franklin Templeton. Unless its higher costs can be passed along to customers, expect some lenders and suppliers to say "never mind" and look elsewhere for business. This would logically reduce the supply of capital and services and could mean higher costs for all municipalities, not just those seeking bankruptcy protection. As my co-authors and I discuss in "Muni Bonds, Pension Liabilities and Investment Due Diligence" by Dr. Susan Mangiero, Dr. Israel Shaked and Mr. Brad Orelowitz (American Bankruptcy Institute Journal, July 2014), the evolution of decision-making can reduce uncertainty. We add that "…legal, economic and political skirmishes associated with municipal bond distress now being played out are helping to set the stage for future clarity." We assert that future bond buyers may still lend to a municipality if they "are comfortable in their belief that large unfunded post-employment obligations can be compromised as part of a distressed-debt workout…" and that "fresh capital can be a lifeline for a municipality that has fallen on hard times, even if it comes with a higher service cost.’

The best outcome is that pension-plagued municipalities seeking to exit from bankruptcy get their financial house in order as quickly as possible. While retirement plan participants have received a reprieve in some situations such as what happened with Stockton, the overall funding crisis is likely to reverberate in ways that could lead to future skirmishes. Witness what is happening right now, courtesy of the U.S. Congress. According to "Pension Bill Seen as Model for Further Cuts" (December 14, 2014), Wall Street Journal reporter John D. McKinnon portends future diminutions in employee benefit payouts if such action is deemed to prevent the "failure of just a few" plans being able to destroy "the federal pension safety net" (i.e. the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation). While the focus of lawmakers right now is on corporate union plans, it is not much of a stretch to imagine certain reductions being allowed throughout the United States and in other countries, postured as protection for the "greater good."

The prospect of being part of millions of retail retirement plans has some financial advisors and hedge fund managers giddy with excitement. The 401(k) market alone is huge. According to the Investment Company Institute, as of Q3-2012, these defined contribution plans held an estimated $3.5 trillion in assets. In 2011, over fifty million U.S. workers were "active 401(k) participants." This compares favorably to an approximate $2.66 trillion hedge fund market size in 2013, up from $2.3 trillion one year earlier. Private equity, real estate and infrastructure comprise the rest of the alternatives investment sector according to a press release issued by Preqin, a financial research company. See "Alternative Assets Industry Hits $6tn in AUM for First Time" (January 21, 2014).

CNBC contributor Shelly K. Schwartz explains that alternative investment strategies are appearing in the form of 400 plus mutual funds and exchange-traded funds ("ETFs") that employ "complex trading strategies" such as managed futures, long/short trading in stocks and multiple currency exposures. Allocating to leveraged loans, start-up ventures and global real estate are other ways that these relatively new funds seem to be mimicking the approach taken by hedge funds and private equity funds that traditionally have catered to institutional investors and high net worth individuals. Notwithstanding regulatory differences relating to diversification, percentage of "illiquid" investments, redemption, daily pricing and how much debt can be used to lever a portfolio, statistics suggest a growing interest on the part of smaller investors to get in on the action. See "Seeking safe havens? Analysts, advisors point to liquid alternative funds" (November 24, 2013). Also check out "Goldman pushes hedge funds for your 401(k)" (Fortune, May 22, 2013) in which reporter Stephen Gandel describes new funds being offered by various financial institutions, some of which invest in mutual funds that mimic hedge fund investing strategies and others that invest in hedge funds directly.

Not everyone is an ardent fan. In "FINRA warns investors on alternative mutual funds," Reuters reporter Trevor Hunnicutt (June 11, 2013) describes regulators’ concerns that "not all advisers and investors understand the risks involved," especially with respect to whether a retail-oriented fund is truly liquid. In its "Alternative Funds Are Not Your Typical Mutual Fund" publication, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority ("FINRA") cautions investors to assess investment structure, strategy risk, investment objectives, operating expenses, the background of a particular fund manager and performance history.

Given the ongoing search for the next big thing, we are likely to see a lot more activity in the alternative investments marketplace – for both institutional and high net worth clients as well as for individuals with modest wealth levels. PensionRiskMatters.com will return to this topic in future posts. There is much to write about with respect to fiduciary implications, risk management and valuation.

In the meantime, I want to thank ERISA attorney David C. Olstein with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP & Affiliates for apprising me of a 2012 U.S. Department of Labor grant of individual exemption for Renaissance Technologies, LLC ("Renaissance").  Described as a "private hedge fund investment company based in New York with over $15 billion under management" by HedgeCo.net (September 26, 2013), Renaissance holds a large number of equity positions in stocks issued by household name companies. Click to see a recent list of their transactions. The "Grant of Individual Exemption Involving Renaissance Technologies, LLC," published in the Federal Register on April 20, 2012 makes for interesting reading for several reasons. First, it describes policies relating to important topics such as valuation, redemption and disclosures for "privately offered collective investment vehicles managed by Renaissance, comprised almost exclusively of proprietary funds" and the impact on retirement accounts in the name of Renaissance employees, some of its owners and spouses of both employees and owners. Second, as far as I know, there are not a lot of publicly available documents about proprietary investment products that find their way into the retirement portfolios of asset management firm employees and shareholders. Third, as earlier described, there is evidence of a growing interest on the part of the financial community in bringing hedge funds or hedge fund "look alike" products to the retirement "masses."

According to the Bank for International Settlements, the notional amount outstanding, as of June 2013, of global over-the-counter derivatives exceeded $692 trillion. Interest rate swaps reflect the largest category at about $425.6 trillion. Given the jumbo size of this market, it is no surprise that regulators have demanded more transparency about the mechanics of the global swaps market, including reporting to regulators and the public dissemination of reported information. It is also no surprise that regulators have demanded what they deem to be risk-reducing measures such as the clearing of these instruments and collateral collection. With the promulgation of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank”), numerous market participants are now required to clear their swaps. Click here to learn about the three categories of organizations that are required to adhere to swap clearing and trade execution requirements under Section 2(h) of the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”). Given the complexity of the prevailing swaps-related rules and regulations as well as the evolving nature of these mandates, any educational insights are welcome.

As an economic consultant, trainer and expert witness who regularly does work in the pension risk management arena and author of Risk Management for Pensions, Endowments and Foundations, I was delighted to have a chance to get comments about this important topic of swaps clearing and trade compliance from Davis Polk attorneys Lanny A. Schwartz and Gabriel D. Rosenberg. Mr. Schwartz is a partner, and Mr. Rosenberg is an associate in Davis Polk’s Trading and Markets practice. Besides the questions and answers provided below, and acknowledging that there is a lot to learn about swaps-related compliance, readers may want to download "Are You Ready? New Swap Trading Requirements For Pension Plan Asset Managers" (August 2013) by Attorneys Schwartz and Rosenberg, in conjunction with BNY Mellon.

Question: What is your motivation for writing about this topic as well as offering educational webinars?

Answer: We continue to receive numerous inquiries from swap market participants, many related to clearing. Swaps dealers were the first to have to demonstrate compliance with Dodd-Frank’s swaps clearing mandate in March of last year. Most asset managers were required to clear specified types of interest rate swaps and credit default swaps as of June 2013. Other entities, including ERISA plans, had a deadline of September 2013.

Question: What areas have you identified as requiring more time and attention?

Answer: We are still mid-stream in terms of implementing a wide array of rules. Compliance is not a simple “check the box” exercise. Some swaps are now subject to mandatory clearing, but this is a relatively small part of the universe in terms of instruments traded in the market. Trading on a regulated futures exchange or swap execution facility is currently voluntary. Margin requirements are not yet final. Documentation requirements are similarly critical and require significant attention.

Question: What is a qualified independent representative and why is that important to an asset manager that has pension plan clients?

Answer: Before a swap dealer can act as an advisor to a pension plan regarding swaps, which in this context means making customized recommendations, the plan manager must verify that the pension plan has a qualified independent representative ("QIR") in place. A QIR is an agent of a Special Entity (such as a corporate or public pension plan) that is knowledgeable and independent of any swap dealer counterparty.

Question: It sounds like there is a large amount of due diligence that must be carried out by swaps dealers, asset managers and end-users such as pension plans, respectively. Would you elaborate?

Answer: You are correct that each category of swap market participant has a large amount of due diligence to carry out in order to ensure that they are compliant with Dodd-Frank’s trading, clearing and other provisions. Swap dealers will generally require counterparties to adhere to one or more of the International Swaps and Derivatives Association (“ISDA”) protocols and other documentation as relevant to their activity. For example, suppose Big Bank X is a leading dealer of swaps and has been approached by Global Asset Management Firm Y to handle its trades on behalf of various end-users such as pension plans of Fortune 500 companies. Before Big Bank X will speak in detail about swaps with Global Asset Management Firm Y, it generally will need to make sure it has proper documentation in place. Unless Global Asset Management Firm Y can demonstrate adherence (or enters into alternative documentation developed by the swap dealer, Big Bank X will generally not transact with them.

Question: What are some of the action steps that a pension plan must take?

Answer: A pension plan, whether a corporate ERISA plan or government employee benefits plan, must have an account with a Futures Commission Merchant (“FCM”) in order to enter into swaps trades that are subject to clearing. This requires diligence and negotiation of important documentation about the clearing relationship. Pension plans should also consider the trade-offs between using swaps and nearly equivalent futures contracts.

Question: Are there areas of vulnerability that need to be better addressed?

Answer: A firm needs to have people in place who are experienced and knowledgeable about Dodd-Frank, operational processing, legal documentation and the use of technology for data inputting and report generation. None of these areas are trivial and require care and diligence. Additionally, since things are in flux as new rules are being adopted, it is critically important for any swap market participant to stay abreast of compliance mandates.

Question: Headlines are replete these days with news about regulatory investigations and lawsuits about how London Interbank Offer Rates (“LIBOR”) are determined by quoting banks. Inasmuch as the majority of swaps are tied to some type of LIBOR fix, how is swaps trading likely to be impacted?

Answer: The increased scrutiny about LIBOR could result in increased regulatory interest in other indexes that are referenced by swaps.

Question: What is the role of external counsel versus the internal General Counsel?

Answer: It is critical for asset managers to develop an educational program that allows front, middle and back office professionals to understand what rules, policies and procedures need to be established and followed. External counsel can add value by explaining the ISDA Protocols and other documentation and compliance requirements to clients. An end-user’s General Counsel should make sure that everything is in place in order to comply with Dodd-Frank. Plenty of clients say they don’t even know where to start and feel overwhelmed.

Question: There is so much more to discuss. Readers should stay tuned for further updates. At the client level, it sounds like you will both remain quite busy.

Answer: Susan, we appreciate the opportunity to share our insights with readers of your blog. We urge everyone with a stake in good governance to pay attention and do whatever is needed to comply with Dodd-Frank’s swaps rules.

Mark your calendars to attend "Muni Bonds, Pensions and Financial Disclosures: Compliance, Litigation and Regulatory Trends."

At a time when unfunded pension and health care obligations are accelerating the budgetary crisis for some municipalities, experts fear that current problems are the tip of the iceberg. A new focus on accounting rules, the quality of disclosure to muni bond investors and the due diligence practices of underwriters, portfolio managers and advisers could mean heightened liability exposure for anyone involved in the nearly $4 trillion public finance marketplace. Add the history-making Detroit bankruptcy decision to the mix and attorneys have the makings of a perfect storm as they attempt to navigate these unchartered waters. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has made no secret of its priority to sue fraudulent players in the public finance market. Insurance companies are reluctant to underwrite policies for high-risk government entities at the same time that municipal fiduciaries are more exposed to personal liability than ever before, especially as the protection of sovereign immunity is being challenged in court. Litigation that involves how much monitoring of risk factors took place is on the rise.

Public finance and securities litigation counsel, both in-house and external, can play a vital role in advising municipal bond market clients as to how best to mitigate litigation and enforcement risk or, in the event that an enforcement action has already been filed, how best to defend such litigation. Please join Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP partner, Elaine C. Greenberg, and retirement plan fiduciary expert, Dr. Susan Mangiero, for an educational and pro-active program about the complex compliance and litigation landscape for municipal bond issuers, underwriters, asset managers and advisers. Topics of discussion include the following:

  • Description of the current regulatory environment and why we are likely to see much more emphasis on the disclosure activities of public finance issuers and the due diligence practices of underwriters and advisers;
  • Overview of hot button items that impact a bond issuer’s liability exposure, to include valuation of underlying collateral, rights to rescind benefit programs in bankruptcy and the use of derivatives as part of a financing transaction;
  • Explanation of GASB accounting rules for pension plans and likely impact on regulatory oversight of securities disclosure compliance and related enforcement exposures;
  • Discussion about trends in municipal bond litigation – who is getting sued and on what basis; and
  • Description of pro-active steps that governments and other market participants can take to mitigate their legal, economic and fiduciary risk exposures.

Featured Speakers:

Ms. Elaine C. Greenberg, a partner in Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP’s Washington, D.C., office, is a member of the Securities Litigation & Regulatory Enforcement Group. Ms. Greenberg’s practice focuses on securities and regulatory enforcement actions, securities litigation, and public finance. Ms. Greenberg is nationally recognized for producing high-impact enforcement actions, bringing cases of first impression and negotiating precedent-setting settlements, she possesses deep institutional knowledge of SEC policies, practices, and procedures. Ms. Greenberg brings more than 25 years of securities law experience, and as a Senior Officer in the SEC’s Enforcement Division, she served in dual roles as Associate Director and as National Chief of a Specialized Unit. As Associate Director of Enforcement for the SEC’s Philadelphia Regional Office, she oversaw the SEC’s enforcement program for the Mid-Atlantic region and provided overall management direction to her staff in the areas of investigation, litigation and internal controls. In 2010, she was appointed the first Chief of the Enforcement Division’s Specialized Unit for Municipal Securities and Public Pensions, responsible for building and maintaining a nation-wide unit, and tasked with overseeing and managing the SEC’s enforcement efforts in the U.S.’s $4 trillion municipal securities and $3 trillion public pension marketplaces. Ms. Greenberg recently gave a speech entitled “Address on Pension Reform” at The Bond Buyer’s California Public Finance Conference in Los Angeles on September 26, 2013.

Dr. Susan Mangiero is a CFA charterholder, certified Financial Risk Manager and Accredited Investment Fiduciary Analyst™. She offers independent risk management and valuation consulting and training. She has provided testimony before the ERISA Advisory Council, the OECD and the International Organization of Pension Supervisors. Dr. Mangiero has served as an expert witness as well as offering behind-the-scenes forensic analysis, calculation of damages and rebuttal report commentary on matters that include distressed debt, valuation, investment risk governance, financial risk management, financial statement disclosures and performance reporting. She has been actively researching and blogging about municipal issuer related retirement issues for the last decade. She has over twenty years of experience in capital markets, global treasury, asset-liability management, portfolio management, economic and investment analysis, derivatives, financial risk control and valuation, including work on trading desks for several global banks, in the areas of fixed income, foreign exchange, interest rate and currency swaps, futures and options. Dr. Mangiero has provided advice about risk management for a wide variety of consulting clients and employers including General Electric, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, Mesirow Financial, Bankers Trust, Bank of America, Chilean pension supervisory, World Bank, Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, RiskMetrics, U.S. Department of Labor, Northern Trust Company and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Dr. Mangiero is the author of Risk Management for Pensions, Endowments and Foundations  (John Wiley & Sons, 2005), a primer on risk and valuation issues, with an emphasis on fiduciary responsibility and best practices. Her articles have appeared in Expert Alert (American Bar Association, Section of Litigation), Hedge Fund Review, Investment Lawyer, Valuation Strategies, RISK Magazine, Financial Services Review, Journal of Indexes, Family Foundation Advisor, Hedgeco.net, Expert Evidence Report, Bankers Magazine and the Journal of Compensation and Benefits. Dr. Mangiero has written chapters for several books, including the Litigation Services Handbook and The Handbook of Interest Rate Risk Management.